5/25/21

Celebrating Pride Month with Ed Busby, SVP of Strategy at TEGNA

TEGNA is proud of our diverse and inclusive culture, where all employees are encouraged to be their authentic selves and where diversity of people and perspectives are highly valued. Today, we’re taking PRIDE in the good company of Ed Busby, SVP of Strategy at TEGNA.

TEGNA is proud of our diverse and inclusive culture, where all employees are encouraged to be their authentic selves and where diversity of people and perspectives are highly valued. Today, we’re taking PRIDE in the good company of Ed Busby, SVP of Strategy at TEGNA.

TEGNA is proud of our diverse and inclusive culture, where all employees are encouraged to be their authentic selves and where diversity of people and perspectives are highly valued. Today, we’re taking PRIDE in the good company of Ed Busby, SVP, Strategy at TEGNA.

Then: Talk about your career path, how you got to where you are today at TEGNA.

I was a Partner at Boston Consulting Group working for media companies around the globe – from Mexico City to Amsterdam to Seoul. It was truly exciting but in the back of my mind, I always wanted to work in local media. When I interviewed with Dave Lougee, I knew I had found the opportunity I was searching for.

Now: What is your current role at TEGNA?

I head up strategy for TEGNA – I help drive internal initiatives, identify new adjacencies for TEGNA, and either incubate them internally or work with the M&A team to acquire businesses. But as Dave Lougee says, there is no strategy without execution. One of my favorite parts of the job is the ability to roll up my sleeves and get my hands dirty – not just “think big thoughts.”

My Halo Moment: What was the most rewarding project you’ve worked on at TEGNA?

Getting Premion off the ground was probably the most rewarding project. Premion actually dated back to my days at BCG when we pitched the idea of aggregating OTT inventory as early as 2008. Since it was founded, Premion has grown into a powerhouse with the entire industry following our lead. It was truly a group effort but I will always be grateful to have had the opportunity to play the role that I did.

Good Company: What does being in good company mean to you?

How many people get the chance to work for a company whose mission is to serve the greater good of our local communities? I truly believe that when we are at our best, we have the ability to help bring people together and to make our communities better places to live. That mission also extends to the salesforce as well; we need to do more than just get “our fair share of spend” – we need to generate real results for our advertisers. But we are all in good company when we are all rowing together towards that “north star.”

Note to Self: What advice would you give yourself looking back on earlier days in your career?

Don’t be afraid to ask for help. Too often I thought that I had to figure it all out on my own. So many others have been through this before. As an LGBT professional in the 90’s in little Providence, RI, there was no roadmap to success. Since then, living in New York, I have been blessed to be part of a huge LGBT community that has given me the opportunity to both be mentored and to mentor others. In a post-COVID world, I am hopeful that the boundaries of geography will be less of a barrier so whether you are in Seattle, WA, or Odessa, TX you can be a part of that broader community.

PRIDE: Why is Pride Month important to you?

One of the most common questions I hear is, “Why do we need Pride Month anymore?” It is so easy for those of us who are in media and live in urban areas to forget that not everybody has it as easy as we have. LGBT youth commit suicide at nearly three times the rate as straight kids. And trans people still face incredible hurdles. I believe familiarity breeds acceptance; if we can help people in our communities to see each other as human beings then we can start changing hearts and minds.

Ready to be in Good Company?